July

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Death arrived first and waited for the rest of us.

She slept in bed beneath a pall of down and cotton,
drifting away from consciousness
while we toiled within it.

We watched her,
our hushed voices rising up into the air,
“What do we do?”
“What’s left?”
The questions rose while spirits sank.

Her body left a cavity where she tucked herself in,
buried under the insidious warmth of the duvet.

Pounds lost were nothing to the gravity upon her.
Her breath ebbed back into her lungs,
following the contoured mattress—
a cushion sloped like the bends of the universe—
compelled by forces pulling it in,
pulling her in,

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Will’s True Quill Pt.1

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Although skepticism regarding the authorship of Shakespeare’s poetry and plays may well have been expressed as soon as William Shakspere (as the family name is spelled in the Holy Trinity Church Register of Stratford-on-Avon) was publicly acknowledged as the illustrious “Bard of Avon,” the first writer to voice his suspicion was James Wilmot, a retired London cleric who in the early 1780′s settled in Warwickshire and proceeded to gather material for a proposed biography of Shakespeare. When he learned that the most famous inhabitant of those parts may well have been the unschooled son of a local tradesman who left not a shred of evidence that he had ever owned a book or written so much as a letter, Wilmot gave up the project and discarded his notes.

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The Final Nail in the Coffin: The Death of Freedom in Our Schools

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“Men fight for liberty and win it with hard knocks. Their children, brought up easy, let it slip away again, poor fools. And their grandchildren are once more slaves.”―D.H. Lawrence No matter what your perspective on the showdown between locals and law enforcement in Ferguson, Missouri, there can be no disputing the fact that “local” police should not be looking or acting like branches of the military. Unfortunately, in the …continue…

Pop-Punk Fans Re-’Joyce’ at New Enigmatic Album from Joyce Manor

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In their latest album, Never Hungover Again, alternative pop-punk band Joyce Manor sticks true to the simplicity and rhythm that have leveled them with artists like Weezer since the release of their self-titled full-length album in 2011. Teeming with emotion, this record is deep enough for listeners to dive into.

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Lies, a Parody of Sia’s “Chandelier”

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Party Politicians love the hurt
Don’t feel anything, they will never learn
Money they push down, they push down
I’m the one “to represent you all”
Polls going up, representatives ring’ doorbells
But there is no love, there is no love
1,2,3,1,2,3 Lies
1,2,3,1,2,3 Lies
1,2,3,1,2,3 Lies
Throw the truth back ‘til we believe you

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Don’t Forget to Tip Your Cows

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I used to love eating cold cereal. I used to love Cocoa Krispies, Count Chocula, Trix, and especially Lucky Charms. Fiber was never a thought when I drowned my bowl in cereal and milk and dug in, enjoying the sugar rush. It was all so magically delicious until the ride in to school.

Homeroom. I was either late, running to the bathroom or stuck behind a desk, clutching the small, wooden structure. Sometimes, after the bell rung, I would escape back into the bathroom, trying to relieve those harsh, stomach pains.

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#ThrowbackThursday: Julie Esposito Revives Old Hollywood

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Old Hollywood comes alive in the voice of Julie Esposito as she reinterprets a few of the film industry’s lesser-known gems. “I am too young to be old Hollywood,” she says, “but I guess I have always had an old soul.” The songs Esposito features in her 2007 self-produced album, Unsung Hollywood, include the whimsical and the romantic, some from as far back as the 1920s and 1930s. Indeed, an album standout, “Little Jazz Bird,” was written in 1923 and omitted from the 1947 film Lady Be Good. This track in particular embodies the benevolent cabaret-style of Prohibition era speakeasies and jazz clubs with lively horns, deep piano, and Esposito’s slightly sardonic tone.

One of the newest tracks Esposito croons called “What Can You Lose?” comes from Dick Tracy, a 1990 film crafted in the style of a 1930s detective drama.

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Rock for All: Four New Singles for the Classic or Post-Modern Rock Fan in You

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Beating its way into your heart with its jazzy drums, and grungy guitar and vocals, Stereo Off’s first single “Bullet Time” is just simply awesome. With synth backing, reminding you of the eighties — without being too overused — this song is electric and captivating, much like the common romantic situation that the band explains inspired it: “the song is about lovers— that feeling when you get to an impasse, and instead, you both slow down and are drawn back together.”