When Trauma Isn’t Traumatic Enough

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We as a media consuming society know that there is a gap between what we see on screen and what we experience in reality. The gap can be sizable at times and at other times it is barely noticeable. This gap between our perceived “fantasy” reality on screen and our actual reality has caused many an outcry, whether it is about the level of violence in video games or the unrealistic body image promoted by films. The gap troubles us but not as much as it should.

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The Bletchley Circle

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The Bletchley Circle is an enormously popular British miniseries about four women who worked as codebreakers in World War II in Bletchley Park outside London and who are able to put their skills and training to good use after the war to track down criminals outside police channels. In the first season, which premiered in the U.S. in 2013, the four women went after a serial killer after picking up what the police had missed – the hidden pattern of the killings. Like many popular films, its interest is sociological as much as dramatic, for such films are popular precisely because they strike a responsive chord in the viewing audience.

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Book Review: Fifteen Digits

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They were out. He thought they were out. All cards on the table except one, Spade now staring daggers at them. But they were a unified front, formidable in decision and determination. They all got what they wanted. Freedom. Love. Disney World. They were riding high from the rising tide below, basement level. Nothing was going to bring them down. But Suicide Kings are wild, and the Vegas high crashed and burned.

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The Year of The Robot in Cinema: 2015 Takes Us Back to Technophobia

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For years we’ve seen films with plots concerning alien invasions or robots out for revenge on the people of Earth. In these stories, Hollywood reflects our fears associated with the overreach and unpredictable side of technology. But why are we so afraid of something we created ourselves? Viewing the social timeline of these anxieties from Hollywood’s perspective, we can see not only the evolution of society’s technophobia, but the driving forces behind our fears of mechanical mayhem.

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The Fung Brothers and Post-Racialism

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The Fung Brothers Comedy make a lot of Youtube videos with an Asian-related topic told from a strictly Asian point-of-view. In a recent video, the Fung Brothers explain why: The Fung Brothers make so many “Asian” videos because according to them, no one else is going to start the conversation surrounding issues in the Asian American community (e.g. invisibility in mainstream American culture).

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Sonnet Mondal: A Poet Of Versatile Talent

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Sonnet Mondal is a fresh and multitalented versatile Indian English poet whose poetry deals with various aspects of life. Literature is the manifestation of socio-historical pressures; Sonnet Mondal believes that poetry should function as the incitement for rebellion. Poetry must be useful, must serve the lumpy points of common sense. The poetry should reach to common man with simple and lucid way of representation.

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Book Review: The Branches of Time

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In the words of Billy Idol, “It’s a nice day to start again. It’s a nice day for a white wedding.” Beautiful snow. Crisp hope. New beginnings. Innocent love. All to be obliterated by rocks falling from heaven, and all that white now crimson.

Three lives are shattered. Sanctuary obliterated. Questions unanswered. The enemy remains unseen, a shadow of doubt, and the dead disappear under a veil of mystery. Dark magic is at hand.

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Album Reviews: Luna Park, Undertow, and Is Love A Fairy Tale

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It’s been a nice return to Matthias Sturm’s voice in Luna Park. After first hearing his debut album Blood and Thunder (2012), his new venture is a bit edgier. Still, something about his voice stays with you throughout the day. It has this veil of comfort like a kindhearted tale. It’s easy to fall under his sweet spell.

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Literature Review: Melissa Mendelson’s “Porcelain” Classically Thrilling

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Melissa Mendelson’s Porcelain, a horror novella in her upcoming Notebook Stories series, features Paige and Shelli, sisters spending a seemingly monotonous summer together with family in a middle-of-nowhere town. Troubled Paige and troublesome Shelli, exploring the few entertainment options this little Hicktown has to offer, happen upon an eerie antique store, and here begins the story’s classically frightening arc – a large ominous window hides the store’s angry shopkeeper and his angry, potentially possessed porcelain doll.

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A Leading Man, John Cho, and Selfie

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GQ Qi (Jack Yang) is a talented and handsome actor who can’t seem to get a break. That is until he lands a coveted role on a television sitcom. The only problem—the role is for a character named Kung Pao, a Chinese foreign exchange student. Not only is his name offensive but also the lines and mannerisms assigned to him. Fed up with the blatant stereotyping, GQ foils a plan to expose the executive producer of the show, Mitch Lebowitz (Bruno Oliver). He enlists the help of a production assistant, Kelvin Kim (Raymond Lee), but once again GQ can’t catch a break because the role is so coveted that Kim turns against GQ for an opportunity to replace him as the star.

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